Home Prairie and Wetland Center
16245 South Hwy. 71
Belton, MO 64012
Tel: (816) 331-9738
Fax: (816) 331-9739

Spartina pectinata

Prairie Cord Grass

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Spartina pectinata (Prairie Cord Grass)

Long, graceful blades are sharply serrated and can easily cut skin, giving the plant its common name, Rip Gut. Inconspicuous flowers bloom in late summer. Prairie Cord Grass forms a sod with its heavy, multi-branched root system that can reach a depth of ten feet. Spreads by seed and creeping rhizomes to form dense, monotypic patches. Offers both food and cover for a variety of wildlife. Excellent selection for stabilizing stream banks, pond edges and other wet areas.

Additional Information:
Was used by pioneers to create sod houses and thatched roofs. Blades were also braided into fuel cords.


Height
4-10 Feet

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Spread
2-4 Feet

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USDA Hardiness Zone 4-5

Home Owner Growing and Maintenance Tips:

Good Companions
Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis), Joe Pye Weed (Eupatorium purpureum)

Characteristics & Attributes

Hydrologic Designation

FACW+

Nature Attracting

Songbird

Season of Interest

Late (July-frost)

Soil Moisture

High

Special Uses

Bog

Sun Exposure

Full Sun

USFS MO Ecological Map

Wildlife Benefit

Cover
Food/Small Animals
Food/Birds